TN Promise Students More Likely to Succeed & Less Likely to Drop Out

September 21, 2017  — Tennessee Promise’s students are showing signs of improvement from previous year56 percent of Tennessee Promise students who entered college in 2015 had graduated, transferred to a four-year university or remained in school two years later, compared to 39 percent of recent high school graduates outside of Tennessee Promise had done the same. Meanwhile, 61 percent of non-Promise students who went from high school to community college in 2015 dropped out within two years, compared to only 44 percent of Tennessee Promise students dropped out in the same time frame. Despite these success, enrollment gaps raise equity questions, since minority students were less likely than white students to participate in Tennessee Promise, with 71 percent of eligible white community college students –  yet only 46 percent of eligible black students and 56 percent of Hispanic students – enrolled in 2015. Tennessee also plans to take steps to target students who are still enrolled and push them to finish, looking at data regarding specific majors course loads and summer enrollment, among other factors. For more information on Tennessee’s effort to improve student success, check out our alignment brief on TN SAILS.


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Additional Resources from Higher Ed for Higher Standards

The Leveraging ESSA series to provides several resources to support higher ed and K-12 collaboration in state ESSA plans.

Aligning Expectations
The Aligning Expectations toolkit helps higher education leaders get involved in states’ reviews of  standards and/or assessments.

Alignment Policy Brief
The Alignment Policy Brief Series is designed to elevate best practices and inform higher ed leaders of emerging collaborations with K-12.

Seizing the Moment
The Seizing the Moment report on community college alignment shows how collaboration with K–12 can better support students.

Accelerate Student Transitions. Attack Education’s Toughest Challenges.

February 7, 2017 — Shannon Gilkey, Organizer for Higher Ed for Higher Standards and Director at Education Strategy Group, penned a blog post for the Hunt Institute, “Accelerate Student Transitions. Attack Education’s Toughest Challenges.” Highlighting TN SAILS and Smart Scholars in NY , this blog focuses on scaling successful models to smooth student transitions from K-12 to postsecondary into credit-bearing coursework.


Sign up to receive the Higher Ed for Higher Standards monthly e-newsletter or view our previous newsletters here.

Additional Resources from Higher Ed for Higher Standards

The Leveraging ESSA series to provides several resources to support higher ed and K-12 collaboration in state ESSA plans.

Aligning Expectations
The Aligning Expectations toolkit helps higher education leaders get involved in states’ reviews of  standards and/or assessments.

Alignment Policy Brief
The Alignment Policy Brief Series is designed to elevate best practices and inform higher ed leaders of emerging collaborations with K-12.

Seizing the Moment
The Seizing the Moment report on community college alignment shows how collaboration with K–12 can better support students.

Seamless Pathways: Bridging Tennessee’s Gap Between High School and Postsecondary

January 26, 2017 — A new report, Seamless Pathways: Bridging Tennessee’s Gap Between High School and Postsecondary, outlines recommendations to “radically change the system so that most [Tennessee] students enter and complete postsecondary education.” Less than one-quarter of high school seniors from the graduating class of 2008 received a postsecondary degree or credential within six years of high school graduation, pointing to a need to accelerate attainment to reach Drive to 55, the state’s postsecondary attainment goal. Based on focus groups from across the state, the report suggests fostering collective responsibility for the postsecondary preparedness among K-12 faculty and staff and ensuring all students have equitable access to course opportunities to increase readiness and success, including TN SAILS. For more information on how TN SAILS can improve preparedness and reduce remediation, check out our alignment brief.


Sign up to receive the Higher Ed for Higher Standards monthly e-newsletter or view our previous newsletters here.

Additional Resources from Higher Ed for Higher Standards

The Leveraging ESSA series to provides several resources to support higher ed and K-12 collaboration in state ESSA plans.

Aligning Expectations
The Aligning Expectations toolkit helps higher education leaders get involved in states’ reviews of  standards and/or assessments.

Alignment Policy Brief
The Alignment Policy Brief Series is designed to elevate best practices and inform higher ed leaders of emerging collaborations with K-12.

Seizing the Moment
The Seizing the Moment report on community college alignment shows how collaboration with K–12 can better support students.

H.S. Classes Offer Bypass to Remedial Courses

October 26, 2016 —Edweek recently featured Washington, Hawaii and Tennessee’s work to offer remedial coursework in high school. Important keys to success across state examples include K-12 and higher education faculty collaboration throughout the process, and a focus on rigor centered on setting a true bar for college readiness. This seeming simple approach to college remediation – taking care of readiness problems while students are still in high school is gaining ground, and early findings show success in catapulting students into credit bearing coursework. See more on reducing remediation through transition courses and assessments aligned to college ready benchmarks from our alignment policy brief.


Stay informed! Sign up to receive the Higher Ed for Higher Standards monthly e-newsletter or view our previous newsletters here.

Tennessees Shows Four Year Drop in Need for Remediation

May 31, 2016 — Newly released data from Tennessee shows a four-year drop in the percentage of first-time freshmen who arrived at college in need of remedial classes, from 76.8% in 2011 to 63.3% in 2015. Remedial math rates were lower too: 77.1% in 2011 down to 55.3% in 2015. An article from the Tennessean,  featuring more information from Governor Haslam’s staff, connects the drop in the need for remediation to the success of the SAILS program, a statewide program that offers self-paced remedial coursework in high school, through a collaboration with the local com unity colleges. Offering precollege interventions like SAILS, is an important way higher education can improve student readiness; learn more about the SAILS program in our report, Seizing the Moment: Community Colleges Collaborating to Improve Student Success.


Stay informed! Sign up to receive the Higher Ed for Higher Standards monthly e-newsletter or view our previous newsletters here.

Tennessee Higher Education Leaders Support Aligned Assessments

October 30, 2015 — Leaders representing the Tennessee Board of Regents, Tennessee Independent Colleges & Universities Association, and University of Tennessee have resoundingly supported TNReady, the state’s new assessment aligned to the more rigorous Tennessee State Standards. Read the full letter of support here.

 


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Higher Standards can close the ‘Preparation Gap’

May 14, 2015 — Achieve, Inc. released a report, which found too many states are labeling students proficient when they are not actually well prepared. This discrepancy, referred to as the ‘honesty gap’, illustrates the proficiency gap between rates reported by state tests and those indicated by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) – with over half of all states revealing a 30 percentage point discrepancy. States implementing higher standards and aligned assessments including the Common Core State Standards are seeing great results. For example, in New York, education officials acknowledged the gap between its self-reported proficiency rates and NAEP proficiency was getting worse, adopting revised proficiency requirements more rigorous than NAEP. Kentucky, once ranked, among the worst in the country in terms of proficiency gaps, has cut discrepancies by 17 points to become a “Top Truth Teller” identified by Achieve.

In an article in The Tennessean, John Morgan, chancellor of the Tennessee Board of Regents, spoke about the importance of accurate assessments so students and colleges “really [know] how we’re doing.” Citing the importance of student preparation and self-awareness about their weaknesses, John Morgan believes “honest assessment of these real standards will inform us as to what that student needs” and improve their chances of success.


Stay informed! Sign up to receive the Higher Ed for Higher Standards monthly e-newsletter or view our previous newsletters here.

States Should ‘Stay the Course’ on Common-Core Standards

April 1, 2015

Nancy Zimpher and John Morgan highlight the higher education community’s strong support for higher standards: “Ensuring that our young people are prepared for the challenges of college-level coursework and a good career is not an option; it’s an obligation.”  High standards are “devalued when they become a tool for political pundits” and it is critical that states ‘stay the course’ on Common Core.

Read the full letter here.

Written by: Nancy Zimpher, Chancellor of State University of New York (SUNY) and John Morgan, Chancellor of the Tennessee Board of Regents

Higher standards in K-12 key to students’ future success

February 27, 2015 
“Higher standards in K-12 key to students’ future success” 

Gov. Bill Haslam made a significant investment in the future of Tennesseans when he signed the Tennessee Promise program into law.

Few will disagree that Tennessee Promise — offering future graduates of any Tennessee high school the opportunity to receive two years of community or technical college tuition-free — has the potential to be a game-changer for many Tennessee residents. However, the eventual success of the program hinges on one important factor – how prepared the students are to succeed.

Read the full article here.

Tennessee Community Colleges Presidents Letter

February 11, 2015
Letter to Tennessee Education Commissioner Dr. Candice McQueen

“Dear Commissioner McQueen:

As leaders of Tennessee’s community colleges, we want to express our strong support for the continued implementation of Tennessee’s higher academic standards in our K-12 schools. We applaud the commitment our classroom teachers and school administrators have made over the past few years to raise expectations so that all students can graduate high school prepared for college and careers. We believe you are on the right path, and we support all efforts to ensure that path leads to college and career readiness.

Each year, Tennessee’s community colleges enroll thousands of high school graduates eager to continue their education. Our mission is to help them succeed. Sadly, almost 70 percent of high school graduates who enroll in our institutions have significant gaps in their preparation and require additional learning support to
ready them for college study. Bringing them up to college-level performance requires additional funding and resources, and time spent in remedial learning support significantly decreases the likelihood that students will complete their degree…”

Click here to read the full letter.